Черкаської міської ради Effective Techniques for Teaching Speaking Skills Черкаси 2008 Розділ виставки: «Англійська мова»

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Загальноосвітня школа № 6

Черкаської міської ради


Effective Techniques for Teaching Speaking Skills


Черкаси

2008


Розділ виставки: «Англійська мова»


Малиновська Олена Анатоліївна

Вчитель англійської мови, І категорії

Загальноосвітньої школи І-ІІІ ступенів № 6

Черкаської міської ради


Анотація


Ідея виникла на стику різних розділів лінгвістики і ставить перед собою завдання поєднати різні цілі: розвиток навичок читання поетичних творів, активізацію граматичних структур, введення їх в усне мовлення, роботу над вимовою, виразне читання.

Граматичні явища, які лежать в основі, входять до граматичного мінімуму як вищих, так і середніх навчальних закладів. Це видо-часова система дієслова, модальні дієслова, безособові дієслівні форми, артиклі, порівняльні ступені прикметників і дієприслівників, порядок слів у запитальнихних реченнях та ін. Названі граматичні явища є найбільш частими та необхідними для читання та розуміння поетичної літератури. Вони також найбільш часто вживаються для розмовної мови і підлягають оволодінню на певному рівні автоматизму.
У зібраних у роботі поетичних текстах повтор лише цих граматичних фігур вживається як один із прийомів поетичної мови. Навчання англійської мови саме на таких віршах буде одночасно і прекрасним і з корисним для справи; воно не послабить силу естетичного впливу і не спотворить природу поетичного твору в цілому. It will be beautiful and useful.


Effective Techniques for Teaching Speaking Skills

A poem, short and written in clear language, can be very helpful in teach­ing lexis and speaking to learners of any level. Poems are extremely popular with the elementary pupils. Easy to remember, they serve as a model for their monologues and compositions.

STAGES OF WORK

1. Listening:

give everyone a copy of a poem or write it on the class board;



2. Learn the poem, practise new lexis in pupils ' own examples (My table is on the left. There is a blue carpet on the brown floor.)

3. Speaking:



THE NOUN

NUMBER OF NOUNS


TWO DEEP CLEAR EYES

Two deep clear eyes,

Two ears, a mouth, a nose,

Ten supple fingers,

And ten nimble toes,

Two hands, two feet, two arms, two legs,

And a heart through which love's

blessing flows

Eyes bid ears

Hark:

Ears bid eyes

Mark.

Walter De la Mare


SELF-PORTRAIT OF THE LAUREATE OF NONSENSE


He has ears, and two eyes, and ten fingers,

Leastways if you reckon two thumbs;

Long ago he was one of the singers,

But now he is one of the dumbs.

Edward Lear


HOLDING HANDS

Elephants walking

Along the trails

Are holding hands

By holding tails.

Trunks and tails

Are handy things

When elephants walk

In Circus rings.

Elephants work

And elephants play

And elephants walk

And feel so gay.

And when they walk-It never fails They're holding hands By holding tails.

Lenore M. Link

A GIRL'S GARDEN
(fragment)

She says she planted one

of all things but weed.

A hill each of potatoes,

Radishes, lettuce, peas,

Tomatoes, beets, beans, pumpkins, corn

And even fruit trees.

Robert Frost


* * *

Many windows

Many floors

Many people

Many stores

Many streets

And many hangings

Many whistles

Many clangings

Many, many, many, many -

Many of everything, many of any.

Donald J. Bisset


THE ADJECTIVE AND THE ADVERB


DEGREES OF COMPARISON

A NAUGHTY BOY
(From "A Song About Myself)
(fragment)

There was a naughty boy,

And a naughty boy was he,

He ran away to Scotland,

The people for to see —

Then he found

That the ground

Was as hard,

That a yard

Was as long,

That a song

Was as merry,

That a cherry

Was as red,

That lead

Was as weighty,

That fourscore

Was as eighty,

That a door

Was as wooden

As in England — So he stood in his shoes

And he wonder'd,

He wonder'd, He stood in his shoes

And he wonder'd.

John Keats

WORDS

I know you:

You are light as dreams,

Tough as oak,

Precious as gold,

As poppies and corn,

Or an old cloak:

Sweet as our birds

To the car,

As the burnet rose

In the heat

Of Midsummer:

And strange as the races

Of dead and unborn:

Strange and sweet

Equally,

And familiar

To the eye,

As the dearest faces

That a man knows,

And as lost homes are:

But though older far

Than oldest yew, -

As our hills are, old, —

Worn new

Again and again:

Young as our streams

After rain:

And as dear

As the earth which you prove

That we love.

Edward Thomas


THE DUTY OF THE STRONG


You who are the oldest,

You who are the tallest,

Don't you think you ought to help

The youngest and the smallest?

You who are the strongest,

You who are the quickest,

Don't you think you ought to help

The weakest and the sickest?

Never mind the trouble,

Help them all you can;

Be a little woman!

Be a little man!

Gelett Burgess


LIMERICK

There was an old owl lived in an oak,

The more he heard, the less he spoke;

The less he spoke, the more he heard —

Oh, if men were all like that wise bird!

Anonymous


OUT OF SIGHT, OUT OF MIND

The oftener seen, the more I lust,

The more I lust, the more I smart,

The more I smart, the more I trust,

The more I trust, the heavier heart,

The heavy heart breeds mind unrest;

The rarer seen, the less m mind,

Thе less in mind the lesser pain,

The lesser pain, less grief I find,

The lesser grief, the greater gain,

The greater gain, the merrier I,

Therefore I wish thy sight to fly.

The further off, the more I joy,

The more I joy, the happier life,

The happier life, less hurts annoy,

The lesser hurts; pleasure most rife;

Such pleasures rife shall I obtain

When distance doth depart us twain.

Barnabe Googe


THE PRESENT INDEFINITE TENSE


EVERY TIME I CLIMB A TREE

Every time I climb a tree

Every time I climb a tree

Every time I climb a tree

I scrape a leg

Or skin a knee

And every time I climb a tree

I find some ants

Or dodge a bee

And get the ants

All over me.

For every time I climb a tree

I see a lot of things to see

Swallows, rooftops and TV

And all the fields and farms there be

Every time I climb a tree

Though climbing may be good for ants

It isn't awfully good for pants

But still it's pretty good for me

Every time I climb a tree.

David McCord

THE ROBIN

When up aloft

I fly and fly.

I see in pools

The shining sky,

And a happy bird

Am I, am I!

When I descend

Towards their brink,

I stand, and look,

And stoop, and drink,

And bathe my wings,

And chink and prink.


When winter frosts

Make earth as steel,

I search and search

But find no meal,

And most unhappy

Then I feel.

But when it lasts,

And snows still fall,

I get to feel

No grief at all,

For I turn to a cold stiff

Feathery ball!

Thomas Hardy


THE WIND


It makes the trees all bend one way –

It bends my hat off in its play,

It flies my kite up very high,

It blows the clouds across the sky;

It runs as quickly as the light

In grasses — and it makes them bright;

It touches water in the pool

And ruffles it — it's nice and cool —

But what it really is, who knows?

I only know it when it blows.

I guess it's some big child at play —

Look! Now it's blown my hat away!


Susan Nichols Pulsifer

BIRD TALK

'Think about people —

The way they grow:

They don't have feathers

At all, you know.

They don't eat beetles,

they don't grow wings,

they don't like sitting

sitting on wires and things."

'Think!" said the Robin.

'Think!" said the Jay.

"Aren't people funny

to be that way?"

Aiken Fisher


SIXTEEN

Sixteen

Sees and laughs,

listens and sighs,

sleeps and eats

aches and cries,

babbles, thinks,

loves and hates,

streetches, lives

and hopefully waits.

Carolyn Calahan


THE MONTHS OF THE YEAR

January brings the snow,

Makes the toes and fingers glow.

February brings the rain,

Thaws the frozen ponds again.

March brings breezes loud and shrill,

Stirs the dancing daffodils.

April brings the primrose sweet,

Scatters daisies at our feet.

May brings flocks of pretty lambs,

Skipping by their fluey dams.

June brings tulips, lilies, roses,

Fills the children's hands with posies.

Hot July brings cooling showers,

Strawberries and gilly-flowers.

August brings the sheaves of corn,

Then the Harvest home is borne.

Warm September brings the fruit,

Sportsmen then begin to shoot.

Fresh October brings the pheasant,

Then to gather nuts is pleasant.

Dull November brings the blast,

Then the leaves are falling fast.

Chill December brings the sleet,

Blazing fire and New-Year treat.


Sara Coleridge


THE PRESENT CONTINUOUS TENSE


IN THE DARK

I'm talking to a rabbit...

I'm talking to a sun...

I think I am a hundred —

I'm one.

I`m lying in a forest...

I'm lying in a cave...

I'm talking to a dragon...

I'm BRAVE.

I'm lying on my left side...

I'm lying on my right...

(Heigh-ho!) Good-night.

A.A. Milne


BUSY

I think I am a Puppy, so I'm hanging out my tongue;

I think I am a Camel who

Is looking for a Camel who

Is looking for a Camel who is looking for his Young...

A.A. Milne


WAITING AT THE WINDOW

My drops of rain have different names.

One is John and one is James.


John is waiting to begin.

He's the one I want to win.


James is going slowly on.

Something sort of sticks to John.


John is moving off at last.

James is going pretty fast.

John is rushing down the pane.

James is going slow again.


James has met a sort of smear.

John is getting very near.

A.A. Milne


POOR MOTHER

Your father is working

All day without shirking,

To pay for the clothes that you wear;

Your mother is mending

All day, and attending

To you, with the kindest of care,

And so, while you're playing,

Think of your father, who spaying

And mother, who's working so hard.

Gelett Burgess


MAYING

Now is the time of Maying,

The pretty lambs are playing,

And maids and men,

In glades and glen,

Are straying, playing, maying,

Fa la la, Fa la la.

Straying, playing, maying.

A.H. Miles


ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT

While the moon her watch is keeping,

All through the night,

While the weary world is sleeping,

AH through the night.


Love to thee my thoughts are turning,

All through the night,

A|nd for thee my heart is yearning,

Аll through the night.

Welsh melody


WRITTEN IN MARCH

The cock is crowing,

The stream is flowing,

The cattle arc grazing,

Their heads never raising,

The ploughboy is whooping - anon — anon:

Small clouds are sailing,

Blue sky prevailing,

The rain is over and gone.

William Wordsworth


AUTUMN

The warm sun is failing, the bleak wind is wailing,

The boughs are sighing, the pale flowers are dying,

And the year

On the earth her death-bed, in a shroud of leaves dead,

Is lying.

The chill rain is falling, the night worm is crawling,

The rivers arc swelling, the thunder is knelling

For the year.

Percy Bysshe Shelley


THE PRESENT PERFECT TENSE

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